In Southern California, Poetic Kinetics is perhaps  best known for creating enormous iconic art installations such as the giant astronaut, a roaming caterpillar and butterfly and an 80-foot-long snail at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival through the years.

Now, Los Angeles-based Poetic Kinetics needs your help for its next massive art project that may travel the country before waving through the air in Washington D.C.

The art group, which specializes in large-scale art installations, is asking people to send them messages that reflect their feelings, hopes, fears and anything else they’re experiencing during the novel coronavirus pandemic.

The messages will be handwritten on streamers that will become part of an aerial canopy that makes up their new art project dubbed “Change in the Air.”

“It’s an aerial canopy made up of at times hundreds of thousands of streamers that are individually suspended upon a net and they’re rigged in such a way as to allow for a range of motion. What happens is that you end up having this really fantastic wind-powered kinetic installation that is ultra lightweight and picks up the slightest breeze…they’re really quite mesmerizing,” said Marnie Sehayek, creative strategist for Poetic Kinetics.

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The project is similar to a previous installation by the group called “Visions in Motion,” which was exhibited in Berlin last year to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

That “skynet” as it’s referred to by the group, was approximately 20,000 square feet in size and included hundreds of thousands of steamers.

Sehayek said “Change in the Air” is expected to be about the same size as the “Visions in Motion” project.

“The more messages we get, the larger the piece becomes and we envision it being this stunning display of people power. It’s sort of visualizing what a chorus of voices for change can look like and also simultaneously function as this time capsule of the moment we’re all living through day by day,” she said.

The current project is in the process of digitally soliciting the messages that will eventually end up on the streamers.

“We’re collecting messages that respond to all of the social issues that have been revealed and exacerbated by the pandemic in a very solutions-oriented approach. We’re soliciting the thoughts, feelings, imaginations and dreams of individuals. As isolated as we are right now we’re just seeking a form of engagement and connection and community,” Sehayek said.

As of now there is no deadline for receiving the messages or the completion of the project. But once the project is complete plans call for the canopy to travel the country before it eventually ends up in Washington D.C.

“We feel that particularly with this piece there is an important meaning with displaying this in the nation’s capital,” she said.

To send a message for the project, visit poetickinetics.com.

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